All posts tagged: sketches

On Ashton

Artwork by Ashton Carless Profile by Amelia Anthony I have enjoyed and exercised the privilege of knowing Ashton Carless for years now. He can be frequently seen in action at Carrows or in the art room where he takes AP Studio. To get him talking, ask how good kid, m.A.A.d city compares to To Pimp a Butterfly or ask what he despises most about the US Government. (It’s money in politics, which makes him also a fierce Bernie Sanders supporter.) He spends most evenings creating art and listening to vinyl. His favorite movie is Birdman, his happy song is “Goodnight Ladies” by Lou Reed, and he gets more sleep than any other teen I know. Ashton’s style is unique and hard to parallel, but sometimes his brushstrokes are reminiscent of those of Van Gogh’s lesser-known ink and paper illustrations. He also draws inspiration from pop-art movements of the 1980s and 90s, specifically from work of Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. He likes the impressionist/expressionist movements too, less concretely and more because of the way emotion is conveyed. Ashton has mentioned before …

Pareidolia: Eric Strikes Again

ERIC SPEAKS: “Look, as though you’re only yourself. Here are some drawings for you. I want you to do your part, become susceptible, and become vulnerable to your own emotions. Whatever you feel, you feel. Whatever something reminds you of, accept that and embrace that. For instance, if you see a man and woman and the first thing that comes to your head is your lover, take that and enjoy that feeling. If the black and white of a drawing reminds you of a old romance flick, indulge in that association and whatever mood comes with it. Your brain is a work of so many experiences and dynamic and art is a way to tickle that nerve. Enjoy that tickle! This will just make viewing art more significant, enjoyable and beautiful.” “There’s another wing to art now, one that touches your heart or tickles your brain; It lets you grow a connection. Of course, when I drew these, there were certain moods or feelings I tried to convey. (Of which are very dear to me …

Frame the mundane: Eric Anaya

ERIC SPEAKS: “I didn’t seeing photos in a serious light until I was in High School. The thing I love the most about photos is the simplicity to making a beautiful image. An absolutely lovely photo can be taken as quick as a second, capturing the entire scene, a feeling, an energy, or even an aesthetic. It could be anything too! A boy picking his nose on his father’s shoulders, a haggard man’s shadow pursuing a bank’s granite wall. Even a freckled woman eating a bowl of chow mein. Honestly.  If you can frame the mundane to look interesting or eye-taking, that’s something that should really be appreciated.” “I’ve always enjoyed illustrating, before it was just a lot of doodles and sheet paper drawings. I used to go into things with a plan. I knew what I wanted to draw and was upset when it didn’t come out how I liked to. It was only until just a couple of days ago, when me and a couple of friends settled in Berkeley for some days. It was …

matriarchal and empyreal

HILDEBURH’S WAR by Emily Yin Your orphaned eyes do not befit a queen of noble birth. Ungrateful wretch, always begging when wrought torques hang about your paltry neck. Let them unmake your Danish heart. Remember, you want for nothing except a home. Your daddy renounced you for a fragile peace. And so it goes, an armistice profaned: your son and husband dead within the month. You stateless woman, you shadow apart from man. Daughter of the conquering and mother of the conquered. Hildeburh, your shuddering shoulders and muzzled mouth bring you too close to animal—Hildeburh, don’t go with the Danes across the ocean. It is time to unmoor. PROTECTED by Grace Meyer Neon: visor, vest, jacket when it’s cold, gloves, a safety whistle My mom used to be a crossing guard. Neon: dress, heels, I should have brought a jacket, big earrings, no safety whistle It started the moment he whistled at me. She wanted to be a policewoman. Instead she would hold a sign: neon red hexagon Always Red: Stop. That night No, Stop, …

Jaundice, A Jaunt, Jaune: John

ABOUT JOHN:  “I’m a 20 old year art student from Colombia. I live in Bogota and my favorite color is yellow. Every time my grandma stares at my face, she says I’m yellow and my name tells it too. John, as people know me, is Jaune in french , and in spite of not having a relation with french stuff , Jaune means:  John and Yellow at the same time, so I use it as my nickname . Artworks themselves are already too revealing for also having your real name into exposure.” John Celis, 2015. Mixed media. JOHN SPEAKS*: “My work is just composed of drawings, because even though sometimes I use paint , I just keep in mind that I should be drawing. Aside from other things, like showing skills or concepts, I want my work to be honest about who I am and with how I think , and for me drawing is the media where I can achieve that . This is because drawing is immediate, there’s no time for any lies in …

who·lee·ah: an interview

All words and artwork by Julia Rocha, a senior in high school. Scroll below for an exclusive interview. Self Portrait Along the Borderline between Mexico and the United States Daughter of Frida Daughter of Diego Thought to have been born a mess of mangled appendages, Years later, she reassembles herself. Sewing together baby arms baby legs She emerges fractured and triumphant. Digging herself out of the ground– Her skin covered in chocolate dirt, Finding herself in a desert, She takes after the cacti that grow around her: Never succumbing to thirst. For five years she walked Tiny feet encrusted in burning sand She did not plan to stop walking Until one day, a fence sprouted like a weed: Wrapping itself around her. A metal barricade Tear streaks of rust engraved on its surface She finally stops walking Curled up in the shade of the wall She sleeps for the first time. The first few nights she dreams of sunflowers, Dreams of yellow petals towering over her Covering her like weightless blankets. One night she dreams of …

The Tunnel Magazine Survival Guide: Work to live, don’t live to work

Art and Words by Rory Turner Continuing Part 1 of the Tunnel Magazine Survival Guide, this week we will look closely at how best to cope with the stresses and strains of a creative degree, and the ways to achieve that all important work/life balance. Before you read any further, here are the 5 most important pieces of advice that I would have given myself if I was starting first year: Don’t let your course overrule your life Don’t forget to socialize Eat and sleep sensibly Talk- don’t bottle up negative feelings! Just enjoy the experience! (YOLO) Now we’ll delve deeper into how this advice came about… The downward spiral Having spoken to a number of friends before embarking on this article, it seemed ironic to them that I should be giving people advice on how to deal with stress on their course. After all, having found my first year to be very difficult at times, I had in fact seriously considered calling it a day, and simply dropping out by February. This may come as …

The Tunnel Magazine Survival Guide: Settling into your first year creative course

Part 1: Welcome to your new home – The Studio It’s about 11pm on a cold winter’s night in the depths of November. I’ve just dived into my flat and already the tears are streaming down my face as I cry hysterically down the phone to my mum. It’s been yet another long, tiring day in the studio and once again I’m stressing out about how much work I supposedly have to do over Christmas; I feel absolutely drained. This was a pretty low point in my course but one which I later realized a lot of students go through, but very few talk about. Being on a creative course can be an extremely challenging and tiresome experience, and there is an awful lot to get used to; most definitely NOT the smooth sailing that many people outside the Arts may assume. Personally I found it a difficult transition from an art class of eight to a studio year of eighty-eight, but the advice I received from fellow students and lecturers along the way helped …

The Tunnel Magazine Survival Guide: Introduction

My name is Rory Turner and I am a second year student at the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London. For me this university was absolutely perfect for what I was interested in doing. Known for its highly creative and conceptual approach to architecture, as well as being home to cutting edge research into digital design and robotic fabrication, it is a school I’m very proud to be a part of. Upon entering an institution with a reputation as high as The Bartlett, I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t intimidated. As the months went by and I happily settled in, I was very lucky to have met some truly incredible individuals, getting the chance to gaze firsthand in awe, at work which will forever inspire and astound me. However, the pressure I put upon myself to really excel at my studies and make the most of this wonderful opportunity, at times, could be overwhelming; almost a burden. And I’m sure those feelings are shared by anyone regardless of their path in life, …