All posts tagged: photography

A Complete Eric Anaya

Artwork by Eric Anaya Profile by Amelia Anthony I recently witnessed Eric weave straightfaced through a busy Saturday night in Little Tokyo, holding up a fresh pastel drawing of an alien (see below). People reacted as they always do: some laughed, smiled a bit cautiously, gave him a blank stare, veered away. He was unfazed and continued his way to The Smell, flashing his sketchbook to passerby. It was a fascinating not-quite-social experiment, and a most quintessential Eric Anaya move. He can be characterized by a single earring, a possibly-sly grin, and seemingly boundless charm. Despite an endearing ego, Eric is never be boring to be around; he is rarely in a bad mood and is always bleeding ideas. He calls himself a “progressive,” not in the political sense, but in the way he’s always on the go, antsy, hyperactive. A recent epiphany left him with a careful grasp on the universe and a knowledge of exactly what he wants to do with the rest of his life: make music and kiss cute girls. Eric …

Jelly Bean Memories

A few weeks ago, I was going through old photos at my grandma’s house. Each drawer I opened seemed to be hiding sheafs of memories, like a flock of paper cranes ready to take flight. Even in the middle of boring suburban New Jersey, I could find fifty years plus worth of history and stories and emotions. It makes me wonder where else old histories might be hiding. What other memories lie forgotten in the drawers of our minds? _________________________________________________________________ home           summer is the taste of watermelons. i grew up in the warm sepia glow of lamplight at night, the vague sound of distant fire trucks that somehow tell me everything is alright. the air conditioning is too cold, the fan’s face rotates its gaze around the room, protecting me, reminding me that i am where i belong. outside, the cicadas join a sound that is already in my head. (i translate every touch from japanese, i try my best). summer means long, hot nights where i lie flopped on …

Colorful Day

TEI SPEAKS: ” thank you so much for lending your eyes to my pictures for a few moments of your wonderful colorful day i hope some of these things may have caused you to think fun or weird thoughts and i would love to listen to you in any way that you may want to share things you want to share at any time!!” Tei Park is an A1 hooman bean and one of Tunnel’s rolling artists. You can check out more of her work here, and find out more about our rolling artists/becoming a rolling artist here.

An Inheritance: words and pictures

Images courtesy of Ashley Jimenez Six Things You Will Learn About Being American-Born Chinese by Rona Wang When you are seven and the kids at school pull up the outer corners of their eyes, call you chink or gook, you will not get it. You will not understand why they sneer at your lunches and your clothes and your punctured speech. At eight your favorite after-school television cartoon will feature a Mandarin-speaking character but the voice-actor only speaks gibberish, with the subtitle “Speaking Chinese” in bold underneath, as if that’s good enough to fool you. You learn this is how your language is perceived: a string of nonsense. You are nine and your mother still stumbles over vowels, cannot spit out her words without dipping them first in foreign tones, and you are embarrassed. Don’t be. Be proud of the courage it took for her to cross an ocean into a foreign land which told her she didn’t belong, which told her to go home. Be proud of the tenacity it took to survive the winters of …

Magnificat

  RAIN by Alice Xu The sun burns cold in October & the cloth curved between my thighs catches rain. Beneath my palm: Rosalie’s cross. Bible once beneath. My body, spread out on sapped autumn oak. The cusp of middle-aged rust, rusting like last year’s sycamore leaves. I dream of Louis rubbing his neck & churchyards emptying their stomachs as the sun waits for a funeral.     ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Alice Xu is a high school senior who adores Jane Austen and her novels. She currently serves as a Co-Editor in Chief for her high school’s literary magazine, a Genre Editor for Polyphony H.S., and an Editorial Intern for The Blueshift Journal. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Textploit, Phosphene Literary Journal, The Riveter Review, and elsewhere. Photographs by Hana Tyszka Illustration by Eric Anaya

Frame the mundane: Eric Anaya

ERIC SPEAKS: “I didn’t seeing photos in a serious light until I was in High School. The thing I love the most about photos is the simplicity to making a beautiful image. An absolutely lovely photo can be taken as quick as a second, capturing the entire scene, a feeling, an energy, or even an aesthetic. It could be anything too! A boy picking his nose on his father’s shoulders, a haggard man’s shadow pursuing a bank’s granite wall. Even a freckled woman eating a bowl of chow mein. Honestly.  If you can frame the mundane to look interesting or eye-taking, that’s something that should really be appreciated.” “I’ve always enjoyed illustrating, before it was just a lot of doodles and sheet paper drawings. I used to go into things with a plan. I knew what I wanted to draw and was upset when it didn’t come out how I liked to. It was only until just a couple of days ago, when me and a couple of friends settled in Berkeley for some days. It was …

Still Life: a study in gummy

“Still Life” was taken with a Canon 5d  Mark II, 50 mm lens. MADELINE SPEAKS: “These are all digital photos which I did for a still life project in my photography class, but I really enjoyed doing them and how they came out so I will probably continue it! I wanted to create something whimsical with bright color. I was first inspired by my roommates retainer and other food photography. I thought it would be funny to pair it with gummy teeth and it totally took off from there! I noticed other candy at the store and kept getting inspired.” ABOUT MADELINE:  “I’m 20 years old, but began being interested in photography when I was about 5. My first camera was a pink special edition Barbie Polaroid. I started becoming serious about a career in photography in my second year of high school. In the past I mostly focused on film and dark room photography, but I’m currently working more with my digital camera because of the ease and practicality. I’m from Los Angeles, but just …

Timmy Gibbons – Circus & Anatomy

By Katie Carson Managing Editor Timmy Gibbons is a student from Belfast, who is about to start Foundation Art and Design in Central Saint Martins, London in September. The work shown is from his A-Level Coursework. CIRCUS I have always been interested in the performing arts, having attended drama classes and been acting from a young age. But more importantly, I have always had a fascination with the Circus – the performers, the costumes and everything about it. I remember going to the local Tom Duffy’s Circus when I was very young and being mesmerised by the atmosphere and production. More recently, I have attended the more modern and advanced Cirque du Soleil productions, Quidam and La Nouba. The stages, atmosphere and the characters provided inspiration for me, and this is one of my reasons for choosing the circus as my theme. I would also say that Tod Browning’s 1932 film ‘Freaks’, a film which I have been a fan of for many years, provided some visual inspiration for my project. I stepped out of …

Artist Profile: Pooja Tripathi

My name is Pooja Tripathi, I’m 17 years old and about to start school at UCLA. Conversation isn’t easy for me but sometimes you can hear my voice in the radio waves, playing hip hop and hindustani music, it makes me feel powerful. Black coffee and someone(s) to walk with/talk to is my favorite way to experience time. I’m not good at memorizing or even just holding onto spiderbite feelings so I take photos – of what’s on the ground. What hands are doing. What catches my eyes and fills them. I photograph myself when I’m distant and the people around me when I get a sense of that, that nice thing, “connection”. These images are important to me because in each moment, I felt very intensely about where I was. Sometimes grateful for who I was with, or dulled and stewing and crawling into myself, or aware of air against my skin. Sometimes I wish people wouldn’t respect my personal space. These are moments when I bumped shoulders with something.