All posts tagged: architecture

‘To Sushi’

Words and Images provided by Rory Turner Rory Turner is an undergraduate student at the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL. His 2nd year building project, “Caravaggio Dreams of Sushi,” proposed a sushi restaurant situated along the Regent’s Canal in Hoxton, East London. An experiment in the mastery of light and shadow within architecture; the project became a research platform to explore the interpretation of light within the context of Japanese cultural and artistic traditions which embrace themes of delicacy and subtlety. Following a two-week research trip to Japan, these more sensitive qualities of light were then compared and contrasted to light’s more expressive, dramatic depiction present within Western Renaissance artwork, such as the striking paintings of Caravaggio. I became fascinated by the idea of harnessing light in order to construct darkness, using the shadow as a space for curiosity and invention. Beginning with representations of illuminated “moments” within the architecture etched in chalk; the design method soon evolved into a scientific process of constructing an architecture through physical light experiments with small “sets” for the dining spaces. …

The Tunnel Magazine Survival Guide: Settling into your first year creative course

Part 1: Welcome to your new home – The Studio It’s about 11pm on a cold winter’s night in the depths of November. I’ve just dived into my flat and already the tears are streaming down my face as I cry hysterically down the phone to my mum. It’s been yet another long, tiring day in the studio and once again I’m stressing out about how much work I supposedly have to do over Christmas; I feel absolutely drained. This was a pretty low point in my course but one which I later realized a lot of students go through, but very few talk about. Being on a creative course can be an extremely challenging and tiresome experience, and there is an awful lot to get used to; most definitely NOT the smooth sailing that many people outside the Arts may assume. Personally I found it a difficult transition from an art class of eight to a studio year of eighty-eight, but the advice I received from fellow students and lecturers along the way helped …

The Tunnel Magazine Survival Guide: Introduction

My name is Rory Turner and I am a second year student at the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London. For me this university was absolutely perfect for what I was interested in doing. Known for its highly creative and conceptual approach to architecture, as well as being home to cutting edge research into digital design and robotic fabrication, it is a school I’m very proud to be a part of. Upon entering an institution with a reputation as high as The Bartlett, I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t intimidated. As the months went by and I happily settled in, I was very lucky to have met some truly incredible individuals, getting the chance to gaze firsthand in awe, at work which will forever inspire and astound me. However, the pressure I put upon myself to really excel at my studies and make the most of this wonderful opportunity, at times, could be overwhelming; almost a burden. And I’m sure those feelings are shared by anyone regardless of their path in life, …

Render: architecture by Phoebe

Phoebe Ou-Yang loved to draw houses as a child. Now, she creates building plans via Photoshop, Illustrator, and other programs as an architecture student at Pasadena City College. Phoebe Speaks: “I knew I wanted to be an architect when I was young, I loved to draw little houses that I dreamt of living in. Looking back, I’ve learned a ton since joining the PCC Architecture Program. One of my first professor described architecture as a love hate relationship and I couldn’t agree more. It’s a field that takes years to learn and even when you think you’ve learned all there is about architecture, it doesn’t stop advancing. I’m constantly inspired by other architects and designers in various fields, I think we are very lucky to live in an age where we can easily find and reach a new artist. In the future I’d really love to collaborate with other visual artists and work at a well-known firm, I also wish to dabble in architectural photography someday.”

Ryota Matsumoto’s hybrid architecture

RYOTA SPEAKS ON HIS ARTWORK: The artworks of Ryota Matsumoto develop and demonstrate the hybrid/multi-layered process, where varying scale, juxtaposition of different forms, intertwined textures/tones are applied to reflect the spatio-temporal conditions of our ever-evolving urban, natural, and ecological environments. They are created to act as the catalyst for defining speculative changes in our notions of cities, societies and cultures. His drawings explore a hybrid drawing technique combining both traditional media (ink, acrylic, and graphite) and digital media (algorithmic processing, scripting and image compositing with custom software ). All the lines, curves and forms are created by algorithmic and generative processes. Then they are redefined and reconfigured with traditional painting/drawing techniques that add colors, textures and details to compositions. About Ryota: Ryota Matsumoto is a principal of an award-winning design office, Ryota Matsumoto Studio based in Tokyo. He is an artist, designer and urban planner. Born in 1972, Ryota was raised in  Hong Kong and Japan. He received Master of Architecture from University of Pennsylvania in 2007 after studying at Architectural Association in London and Mackintosh School of Architecture, Glasgow …