All posts tagged: advice

the self-portrait

Words and Paintings by Amelia Anthony I never really painted until around May when I did a portrait of my friend Addy for school. I ended up making another portrait of my friend Harper and one of myself in the same week because I enjoyed it so much. It was easier for me to paint myself, probably because I know my own face well and also because it was so soothing. I didn’t have real deadlines or expectations to my newfound self-portraiture; for the first time in a while creating visual art was relaxing! Previously I had only been a writer—only written about myself instead of painting pictures of myself. Currently, painting is a ritual. I blend the same skin tones and trace the same features soft-listening to music and bask in brushstrokes. Self-love is a very strange thing in media right now; it is trendy to appreciate your image and share that appreciation with other people. However, self-love is something I am unsure anyone has mastered. Self-portraiture has definitely helped me work through self-love; not just …

The Tunnel Magazine Survival Guide: Work to live, don’t live to work

Art and Words by Rory Turner Continuing Part 1 of the Tunnel Magazine Survival Guide, this week we will look closely at how best to cope with the stresses and strains of a creative degree, and the ways to achieve that all important work/life balance. Before you read any further, here are the 5 most important pieces of advice that I would have given myself if I was starting first year: Don’t let your course overrule your life Don’t forget to socialize Eat and sleep sensibly Talk- don’t bottle up negative feelings! Just enjoy the experience! (YOLO) Now we’ll delve deeper into how this advice came about… The downward spiral Having spoken to a number of friends before embarking on this article, it seemed ironic to them that I should be giving people advice on how to deal with stress on their course. After all, having found my first year to be very difficult at times, I had in fact seriously considered calling it a day, and simply dropping out by February. This may come as …

The Tunnel Magazine Survival Guide: Settling into your first year creative course

Part 1: Welcome to your new home – The Studio It’s about 11pm on a cold winter’s night in the depths of November. I’ve just dived into my flat and already the tears are streaming down my face as I cry hysterically down the phone to my mum. It’s been yet another long, tiring day in the studio and once again I’m stressing out about how much work I supposedly have to do over Christmas; I feel absolutely drained. This was a pretty low point in my course but one which I later realized a lot of students go through, but very few talk about. Being on a creative course can be an extremely challenging and tiresome experience, and there is an awful lot to get used to; most definitely NOT the smooth sailing that many people outside the Arts may assume. Personally I found it a difficult transition from an art class of eight to a studio year of eighty-eight, but the advice I received from fellow students and lecturers along the way helped …

The Tunnel Magazine Survival Guide: Introduction

My name is Rory Turner and I am a second year student at the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London. For me this university was absolutely perfect for what I was interested in doing. Known for its highly creative and conceptual approach to architecture, as well as being home to cutting edge research into digital design and robotic fabrication, it is a school I’m very proud to be a part of. Upon entering an institution with a reputation as high as The Bartlett, I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t intimidated. As the months went by and I happily settled in, I was very lucky to have met some truly incredible individuals, getting the chance to gaze firsthand in awe, at work which will forever inspire and astound me. However, the pressure I put upon myself to really excel at my studies and make the most of this wonderful opportunity, at times, could be overwhelming; almost a burden. And I’m sure those feelings are shared by anyone regardless of their path in life, …